All autofocus Sony FE and E-mount lenses for A7 A9

Sony E-mount Prime Lenses | Sony E-mount zoom Lenses | Zeiss Batis Lenses

Sony make questionably the best mirrorless cameras on the market with their new Sony A9 body aimed at sports and wedding photography and the high megapixel Sony A7R II for landscape and studio photography still highly regarded for a camera released in August 2015.

Even some two years later the Sony A7R II is an excellent buy right now as prices are dropping rapidly as the Sony A7R II is being replaced with the new Sony A7R III or Sony A9R. Today you can get a brand new 42MP Sony A7R II from as little as £1,700. This is a 50% reduction on the list price of over £3,000.

It makes good sense if you don’t currently own a Sony A7R II but want to move into mirrorless to purchase one now and invest in some quality Sony lenses for the same price as just the Sony A7R III / Sony A9R body without lenses. The A7R II is still a highly commended camera and still more then adequate with that huge 42MP sensor. And of course if you do upgrade to the Sony A9R later you can still use all your E-mount lenses and benefit from any early issues with the A9R being fixed / updated. I was one of the first to purchase the Nikon D800 and that camera had early problems.

The Sony E-mount has always been trying to catch up with huge amount of lenses offered for Nikon and Canon but Sony has been slowly building up the lenses they offer and now you can pretty much get any lens focal range or aperture that you need. Here is a full run down of all the Sony Autofocus lenses available right now for the Sony A7 A9 full frame cameras.

Sony E-mount Prime Lenses

Sony FE 28 F2.0 Lens – RRP. £429.00

Sony FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA Lens – RRP. £859.00

Sony FE 35 F1.4 ZA Lens – RRP £1,619.00

Sony FE 50mm f/1.4 ZA Lens – RRP £1,500.00

Sony FE 50mm f/1.8 Lens – RRP £299.00

Sony FE 55mm/1.8 ZA Lens – RRP £969.00

Sony FE 50mm f/2.8 Macro Lens – RRP £500.00

Sony FE 85mm F1.8 Lens – RRP £600.00

Sony FE 85mm F1.8 GM Lens – RRP £1,889.00

Sony FE 90mm F2.8 Macro G OSS Lens – RRP £1,079.00

Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF GM OSS – RRP RRP£1,600.00

Zeiss Batis Primes

Zeiss Batis 18mm F2.8 E-mount Lens – RRP £ 1,299.99

Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2.0 Lens – RRP £ 1,129.99

Zeiss Batis 85mm f/1.8 Lens – RRP £ 1,039.99

Zeiss Batis 135mm F2.8 OSS lens – RRP £ 1,749.99

Sony E-mount Zoom Lenses

Sony FE 12-24mm F4 G Lens – RRP £1,700.00

Sony FE 16-35mm f/4 ZA OSS Lens – RRP £1,349.00

Sony FE 16-35mm F2.8 GM Lens – RRP£2,300.00

Sony FE 24-70mm f/4 ZA OSS Lens – RRP £1,129.00

Sony FE 24-70mm F2.8 G Master Lens – RRP £2,269.00

Sony FE 28-70mm F3.5-5.6 OSS – RRP £499.00

Sony FE 24-240 F3.5-6.3 OSS Lens – RRP £989.00

Sony FE 28-135mm f/4 G PZ OSS Lens – RRP £2,479.00

Sony FE 70-200mm f/4 G OSS Lens – RRP £1,509.00

Sony FE 70-200mm F2.8 G Master Lens – RRP £2,500.00

Sony FE 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 G OSS Lens – RRP £1,349.00

Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 GM OSS Lens – RRP £2,500.00

Samsung NX3000 sample hi-res photos review

The Samsung NX3000 is an excellent low cost 20.3MP APS-C crop sensor. Compared to a similar priced the Nikon ie the D3000 / D3100 the Samsung mirrorless NX3000 is a far superior camera.

Because the compact Samsung NX3000 never sold well you can find them used on eBay for under £100.

Below are some hi-res photo samples with the Samsung NX3000.

Glencoe Loch Leven NX3000
Glencoe Loch Leven NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 20-50mm Lens

Glencoe lochan NX3000
Glencoe lochan NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 20-50mm Lens

Non Plus Ultra NX3000
Non Plus Ultra NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 16mm Pancake Lens – Pano

Ballroom Blitz NX3000
Ballroom Blitz NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 16mm Pancake Lens

Asylum Italy staircase NX3000
Asylum Italy staircase NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 16mm Pancake Lens

Abandoned asylum Italy theater
Abandoned asylum Italy theater NX3000

Samsung NX3000 / Samsung 16mm Pancake Lens

Wellington Rooms Liverpool urbex

The Wellington Rooms, or as it is often commonly referred to, The Irish Centre.

Was designed by the architect Edmund Aikin and built between 1815–1816 as a subscription assembly room for the Wellington Club. It was originally used by high society for assemblies, dance balls and parties. Between 1923 and 1940 it was the Embassy Club and was used for tea dances, classes and weddings. During WW2, the building became the first base for the Rodney Youth Centre though bomb damage in 1941 damaged all of the original ceilings with the exception of the ballroom.

The building officially opened as Liverpool Irish Centre on 1 February 1965 hosting ceilis, music, drama performances as well as serving as a base for clubs and societies.

Neo-classical in style the building’s facade is Grade II listed, but it is now blackened and the building is derelict. The building was designed with a central entrance that leads into an octagonal room from which three further rooms can be accessed from. These were originally used as a drawing room, refreshment room and ballroom. The building had three separate entrances which were intend for men, ladies and sedan-chairs & carriages. The building has now been closed for about 20 years. But there are now plans to re-open the building as a science and technology hub.

Wellington Rooms
Wellington Rooms

Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum Italy

Once home to 6,000 patients sent for ‘treatment’ but were never allowed to leave.

Ospedale Psichiatrico di Volterra was a former psychiatric hospital in Tuscany, Italy
It was home to more than 6,000 mental patients but was shut down in 1978 because its practices were deemed cruel.

The hospital was called ‘the place of no return’ because patients supposedly never returned home.

Walls of courtyard are still covered in the carvings of a patient who was locked inside for more than a decade.

Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum
Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum