Urban Decay

Wellington Rooms Liverpool urbex

The Wellington Rooms, or as it is often commonly referred to, The Irish Centre.

Was designed by the architect Edmund Aikin and built between 1815–1816 as a subscription assembly room for the Wellington Club. It was originally used by high society for assemblies, dance balls and parties. Between 1923 and 1940 it was the Embassy Club and was used for tea dances, classes and weddings. During WW2, the building became the first base for the Rodney Youth Centre though bomb damage in 1941 damaged all of the original ceilings with the exception of the ballroom.

The building officially opened as Liverpool Irish Centre on 1 February 1965 hosting ceilis, music, drama performances as well as serving as a base for clubs and societies.

Neo-classical in style the building’s facade is Grade II listed, but it is now blackened and the building is derelict. The building was designed with a central entrance that leads into an octagonal room from which three further rooms can be accessed from. These were originally used as a drawing room, refreshment room and ballroom. The building had three separate entrances which were intend for men, ladies and sedan-chairs & carriages. The building has now been closed for about 20 years. But there are now plans to re-open the building as a science and technology hub.

Wellington Rooms
Wellington Rooms

Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum Italy

Once home to 6,000 patients sent for ‘treatment’ but were never allowed to leave.

Ospedale Psichiatrico di Volterra was a former psychiatric hospital in Tuscany, Italy
It was home to more than 6,000 mental patients but was shut down in 1978 because its practices were deemed cruel.

The hospital was called ‘the place of no return’ because patients supposedly never returned home.

Walls of courtyard are still covered in the carvings of a patient who was locked inside for more than a decade.

Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum
Manicomio di C Abandoned Asylum

Non Plus Ultra Sammezzano Castle

Sammezzano, or the Castle of Sammezzano, is an Italian palazzo in Tuscany notable for its Moorish Revival architectural style.

The original palazzo was erected in about 1605 by the Spanish nobleman, Ximenes of Aragon. In the 19th century, Ferdinand Panciatichi Ximenes inherited the property and, between 1853 and 1889, remodeled it into one of the largest examples of Moorish Revival architecture. Umberto I, king of Italy, visited Ximenes at Sammezzano in 1878.

The palazzo served as a luxury hotel in the post WWII era, then was vacated and closed. A committee called FPXA 1813-2013, acronym for Ferdinand Panciatichi Ximenes d’Aragon, was organized in 2012 to attempt to restore and preserve the palazzo, which has 365 rooms, each with unique, Moorish decoration.

Abandoned since the 1990s, after plans to transform it into a luxury hotel fell through.

Sammezzano Castle
Sammezzano Castle

Abandoned House Of Sisters

House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters

Regarded as the most austere women’s orders of the Roman Catholic church, being devoted to prayer, penance, contemplation, manual work and adopting the strictest enclosure, severe fasts, and other austerities it also meant that they would never leave the convent once they have taken their vows to enter their days would be spent in prayer and working the land in order to provide for them selves a total life of silence and solitude with no contact with the outside world.

House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters
House Of Sisters

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