history

Denbigh County Mental Asylum Abandoned England UK Denbighshire County Lunatic Asylum photography

Designed by architect Thomas Fulljames, the Denbighshire County Lunatic Asylum was opened in 1848 as the 1st Welsh asylum built as a refuge from the maltreatment in English asylums of Welsh speaking patients. Amongst locals for many years the old Gothic institution has been referred to simply as ‘Denbigh Mental’. A small stripped chapel lies to the back of the site behind the maintenance shops and boiler house which was added to the site in 1862.

Various interesting and experimental treatments were tested and developed at Denbigh over the course of its history. In 1871 Turkish baths were installed to treat melancholia amongst other ilnesses and in 1916 all epileptic patients in the asylum were placed on a vegetarian diet since epilepsy during the early 1900’s was still at the centre of much speculative research. Electro-convulsive shock therapy was also introduced at the hospital in 1941 as a means of managing the symptoms of madness, other ‘cures’ for delirium also included Sleep therapy and the widespread practice of the pre-frontal leucotomy.

The asylum reached a maximum holding capacity in 1956 housing just over 1,500 patients. This number however slowly decreased over the years as various parts of the hospital faced closure including the farms, workshops and various wards in order to cut costs until 1995 when the asylum shut down indefinitely. The now derelict buildings featured most recently in a television series called ‘Most Haunted’. The administration block, although severely dilapidated is grade II listed but sadly in November of 2008 the main theatre was completely destroyed by an arson attack.

This incident occurred 2 weeks after a listing proposal was brought forward to the local council regarding the main halls status. Denbigh’s future looks bleak and as with most asylums, the land it lies on represents a redevelopment premium in location and so her beautiful old battered corridors man not survive for much longer.

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys Bushey Abandoned boys school masonic lodge

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

The Royal Masonic School for Boys was an independent school for boys in England.

From 1798 charities were set up for clothing and educating sons of needy Freemasons. They originally provided education by sending them to schools near to their homes. A specific masonic boys’ school was set up at Wood Green in North London in 1857 following amalgamation of the charities in 1852.

A new school was built in Bushey, Hertfordshire in 1903 and a Junior School was added on the other side of The Avenue in 1929. By 1939 there were 800 boys at the school.Following a decline in pupil numbers the junior school closed in 1970; the site is now occupied by Bushey Academy. Numbers continued to fall, and the senior school closed in 1977. For a time, the buildings housed the United States International University (Europe). Both schools were commonly used for films (such as Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life, Lucky Jim (twice), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and numerous TV shows) from the 1950s until recently. They have now been redeveloped as luxury housing.

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...