Urban decay

Abandoned Hospital the Cambridge Military Hospital

Urban decay and peeling paint. The Cambridge Military Hospital opened its doors to patients in 1879. The name Cambridge came from His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge who was the Commander-in-Chief of the Army at the time. The hospital was built on a hill because current clinical thinking at the time thought that the wind would sweep away any infection and clean the air. The CMH was famed for its supposedly mile long corridor, with self contained wards and rooms branching off on either side.

It was hoped that this design would reduce cross infection. The Louise Margaret Hospital opened in 1898 and eventually changed its name and purpose in 1958 to become the Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital, caring solely for mothers and babies. The CMH was used throughout its years to house casualties from the majority of the wars this country has seen; from the first world war upto the first gulf war. The Cambridge Military Hospital closed down in 1996. Many factors were given as the reason for its closure; cost to maintain, efficiency and asbestos were among them.

Cambridge Military Hospital
Cambridge Military Hospital
LLMH - Theatre Corridor
LLMH – Theatre Corridor
LLMH - Blackout
LLMH – Blackout

LMMH - Switch
LMMH – Switch
LMMH - Peeling Paint and open doors
LMMH – Peeling Paint and open doors
LMMH - The lights are on
LMMH – The lights are on

lmmh - peeltastic with correction
lmmh – peeltastic with correction
CMH - Hospital
CMH – Hospital
CMH - Lonely Ward
CMH – Lonely Ward

Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital - Bathroom
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital – Bathroom
LMMH - Peeling Paint
LMMH – Peeling Paint
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital - The Bleeding Doors
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital – The Bleeding Doors

Cambridge Military Hospital - Corridor Lamps
Cambridge Military Hospital – Corridor Lamps
CMH - Admin Corridor
CMH – Admin Corridor
CMH - Hospital
CMH – Hospital

Steep House abandoned Potters manor UK

Steep House / Potters Manor House was built in 1904. The last inhabitants were a family of artisans and potters and for some reason, that we will probably never know, left the house with all its contents including many paintings and full wardrobes of clothes. Over the years the house has suffered from looting, pillaging and vandalism.

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Lillesden school for girls

Lillesden School for Girls occupies what used to be the Lillesden Estate Mansion, built at the estate (south of Hawkhurst) by the banker Edward Loyd, who co-founded the Loyd Entwistle & Co bank, which later became the District Bank and ultimately the National Westminster (Natwest). Loyd had Lillesden Mansion built after he married Caroline Louisa Foster on the 12th March 1846 at Ashton-on-Mersey. He bought the Lillesden estate at Hawkhurst, Kent in 1853 and built the mansion, finished in 1855.

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Sheffield crown courts photography

Sheffield Old Town Hall stands in central Sheffield, England. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield’s first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Pettyand Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804-1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate.

At the same time, the building’s courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees’ hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.

Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex

Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex

Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex

Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex
Sheffield crown courts urbex

Whittingham and Talgarth Asylums photography

Whittingham Asylum. The hospital was founded in 1869 and grew to be the largest mental hospital in Britain, and pioneered the use of electroencephalograms. During its time it had its own church, farms, railway, telephone exchange, post office, reservoirs, gas works, brewery, orchestra, brass band, ballroom and butchers. It closed in 1995 with a history of serious complaints of cruelty, ill-treatment and fraud in the hospital.

Talgarth Asylum, Wales. Originally called the Brecon and Radnor Joint Asylum, it became the Mid Wales Hospital in 1921 and was built in an echelon, or “compact arrow“, style, allowing for quick movement between any two points of the 200,000 square foot hospital.

Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum

Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum

Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Whittingham Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum

Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum

Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum
Talgarth Asylum

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