Urban decay

Heavy Metal Belgium abandoned steel plant Urbex urban exploration

Heavy Metal Belgium abandoned steel plant.

The company inherited a steel industry with significant debts and production overcapacity based on blast furnace production rather than electric furnace recycling, with numerous factory sites in constrained city locations, and adversely affected by competition in the export market from new steel producing countries such as South Korea and Brasil. The need to streamline was complicated by regional dependence on employment by the steel industry.

The steel plant was supplied by rail using 130t capacity torpedo wagons. The plant had three LD converters, facilities for iron desulphurisation and vacuum treatment. Production is by continuous casting with a capacity of 3.5million tonnes per annum, the primary product is hot rolled steel coil up to 2m wide.

In October 2011 AM announced the closure of liquid steel (“hot phase”) at Heavy Metal, Part of the site is still live which includes a Hot rolling Mill which briefly stopped in from May to April 2009 due to the economic downturn caused by the financial crisis of 20072010.

The liquid steel buildings were closed in 2012 and the rest of the site hangs in the balance as of 2013.

Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium

Exploring Abandoned Packard Motor Plant Detroit Michigan USA

The Packard Automotive Plant is a former automobile-manufacturing factory in Detroit, Michigan where luxury cars were made by the Packard Motor Car Company and later by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

The Packard plant was opened in 1903 and at the time was considered the most modern automobile manufacturing facility in the world with skilled craftsmen involved in over eighty trades. The factory complex closed in 1958, though other businesses operated on the premises or used it for storage until the late 1990s.

A number of the outer buildings were in use by businesses up through the early 2000s. In 2010, the last remaining tenant, Chemical Processing, announced its intention to vacate the premises after 52 years.

Since its abandonment, the plant has been a haven for graffiti artists, urban explorers, paintballers and auto scrappers, and much of the wiring and other building material has been scavenged. In one incident, vandals pushed a dump truck from the fourth floor. Karen Nagher, the executive director of the nonprofit organization Preservation Wayne, stated that she was irked to see people come from “all over the world” to poke around Detroit. “Piece by piece, they’re disassembling those buildings, making it harder and harder to restore them”.

Despite many years of neglect and abuse, the reinforced concrete structures remain mostly intact and structurally sound. Portions of the upper floors of several small sections in various buildings have collapsed or been partly demolished and lay in ruins in the wake of several aborted attempts at demolition over the years.

Many films have been shot here including most recently scenes for the Michael Bay fifth Transformers movie, staring Mark Wahlberg.

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Abandoned Hospital the Cambridge Military Hospital

Urban decay and peeling paint. The Cambridge Military Hospital opened its doors to patients in 1879. The name Cambridge came from His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge who was the Commander-in-Chief of the Army at the time. The hospital was built on a hill because current clinical thinking at the time thought that the wind would sweep away any infection and clean the air. The CMH was famed for its supposedly mile long corridor, with self contained wards and rooms branching off on either side.

It was hoped that this design would reduce cross infection. The Louise Margaret Hospital opened in 1898 and eventually changed its name and purpose in 1958 to become the Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital, caring solely for mothers and babies. The CMH was used throughout its years to house casualties from the majority of the wars this country has seen; from the first world war upto the first gulf war. The Cambridge Military Hospital closed down in 1996. Many factors were given as the reason for its closure; cost to maintain, efficiency and asbestos were among them.

Cambridge Military Hospital
Cambridge Military Hospital
LLMH - Theatre Corridor
LLMH – Theatre Corridor
LLMH - Blackout
LLMH – Blackout

LMMH - Switch
LMMH – Switch
LMMH - Peeling Paint and open doors
LMMH – Peeling Paint and open doors
LMMH - The lights are on
LMMH – The lights are on

lmmh - peeltastic with correction
lmmh – peeltastic with correction
CMH - Hospital
CMH – Hospital
CMH - Lonely Ward
CMH – Lonely Ward

Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital - Bathroom
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital – Bathroom
LMMH - Peeling Paint
LMMH – Peeling Paint
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital - The Bleeding Doors
Louise Margaret Maternity Hospital – The Bleeding Doors

Cambridge Military Hospital - Corridor Lamps
Cambridge Military Hospital – Corridor Lamps
CMH - Admin Corridor
CMH – Admin Corridor
CMH - Hospital
CMH – Hospital

Steep House abandoned Potters manor UK

Steep House / Potters Manor House was built in 1904. The last inhabitants were a family of artisans and potters and for some reason, that we will probably never know, left the house with all its contents including many paintings and full wardrobes of clothes. Over the years the house has suffered from looting, pillaging and vandalism.

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor
Steep House abandoned Potters manor

Lillesden school for girls

Lillesden School for Girls occupies what used to be the Lillesden Estate Mansion, built at the estate (south of Hawkhurst) by the banker Edward Loyd, who co-founded the Loyd Entwistle & Co bank, which later became the District Bank and ultimately the National Westminster (Natwest). Loyd had Lillesden Mansion built after he married Caroline Louisa Foster on the 12th March 1846 at Ashton-on-Mersey. He bought the Lillesden estate at Hawkhurst, Kent in 1853 and built the mansion, finished in 1855.

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls
Lillesden School for girls

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