urbex

Heavy Metal Belgium abandoned steel plant Urbex urban exploration

Heavy Metal Belgium abandoned steel plant.

The company inherited a steel industry with significant debts and production overcapacity based on blast furnace production rather than electric furnace recycling, with numerous factory sites in constrained city locations, and adversely affected by competition in the export market from new steel producing countries such as South Korea and Brasil. The need to streamline was complicated by regional dependence on employment by the steel industry.

The steel plant was supplied by rail using 130t capacity torpedo wagons. The plant had three LD converters, facilities for iron desulphurisation and vacuum treatment. Production is by continuous casting with a capacity of 3.5million tonnes per annum, the primary product is hot rolled steel coil up to 2m wide.

In October 2011 AM announced the closure of liquid steel (“hot phase”) at Heavy Metal, Part of the site is still live which includes a Hot rolling Mill which briefly stopped in from May to April 2009 due to the economic downturn caused by the financial crisis of 20072010.

The liquid steel buildings were closed in 2012 and the rest of the site hangs in the balance as of 2013.

Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium
Heavy Metal urbex Belgium

Denbigh County Mental Asylum Abandoned England UK Denbighshire County Lunatic Asylum photography

Designed by architect Thomas Fulljames, the Denbighshire County Lunatic Asylum was opened in 1848 as the 1st Welsh asylum built as a refuge from the maltreatment in English asylums of Welsh speaking patients. Amongst locals for many years the old Gothic institution has been referred to simply as ‘Denbigh Mental’. A small stripped chapel lies to the back of the site behind the maintenance shops and boiler house which was added to the site in 1862.

Various interesting and experimental treatments were tested and developed at Denbigh over the course of its history. In 1871 Turkish baths were installed to treat melancholia amongst other ilnesses and in 1916 all epileptic patients in the asylum were placed on a vegetarian diet since epilepsy during the early 1900’s was still at the centre of much speculative research. Electro-convulsive shock therapy was also introduced at the hospital in 1941 as a means of managing the symptoms of madness, other ‘cures’ for delirium also included Sleep therapy and the widespread practice of the pre-frontal leucotomy.

The asylum reached a maximum holding capacity in 1956 housing just over 1,500 patients. This number however slowly decreased over the years as various parts of the hospital faced closure including the farms, workshops and various wards in order to cut costs until 1995 when the asylum shut down indefinitely. The now derelict buildings featured most recently in a television series called ‘Most Haunted’. The administration block, although severely dilapidated is grade II listed but sadly in November of 2008 the main theatre was completely destroyed by an arson attack.

This incident occurred 2 weeks after a listing proposal was brought forward to the local council regarding the main halls status. Denbigh’s future looks bleak and as with most asylums, the land it lies on represents a redevelopment premium in location and so her beautiful old battered corridors man not survive for much longer.

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum
Denbigh Asylum

Exploring Abandoned Packard Motor Plant Detroit Michigan USA

The Packard Automotive Plant is a former automobile-manufacturing factory in Detroit, Michigan where luxury cars were made by the Packard Motor Car Company and later by the Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

The Packard plant was opened in 1903 and at the time was considered the most modern automobile manufacturing facility in the world with skilled craftsmen involved in over eighty trades. The factory complex closed in 1958, though other businesses operated on the premises or used it for storage until the late 1990s.

A number of the outer buildings were in use by businesses up through the early 2000s. In 2010, the last remaining tenant, Chemical Processing, announced its intention to vacate the premises after 52 years.

Since its abandonment, the plant has been a haven for graffiti artists, urban explorers, paintballers and auto scrappers, and much of the wiring and other building material has been scavenged. In one incident, vandals pushed a dump truck from the fourth floor. Karen Nagher, the executive director of the nonprofit organization Preservation Wayne, stated that she was irked to see people come from “all over the world” to poke around Detroit. “Piece by piece, they’re disassembling those buildings, making it harder and harder to restore them”.

Despite many years of neglect and abuse, the reinforced concrete structures remain mostly intact and structurally sound. Portions of the upper floors of several small sections in various buildings have collapsed or been partly demolished and lay in ruins in the wake of several aborted attempts at demolition over the years.

Many films have been shot here including most recently scenes for the Michael Bay fifth Transformers movie, staring Mark Wahlberg.

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit
Packard Motor Plant Detroit

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys Bushey Abandoned boys school masonic lodge

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

The Royal Masonic School for Boys was an independent school for boys in England.

From 1798 charities were set up for clothing and educating sons of needy Freemasons. They originally provided education by sending them to schools near to their homes. A specific masonic boys’ school was set up at Wood Green in North London in 1857 following amalgamation of the charities in 1852.

A new school was built in Bushey, Hertfordshire in 1903 and a Junior School was added on the other side of The Avenue in 1929. By 1939 there were 800 boys at the school.Following a decline in pupil numbers the junior school closed in 1970; the site is now occupied by Bushey Academy. Numbers continued to fall, and the senior school closed in 1977. For a time, the buildings housed the United States International University (Europe). Both schools were commonly used for films (such as Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life, Lucky Jim (twice), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and numerous TV shows) from the 1950s until recently. They have now been redeveloped as luxury housing.

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys
Exploring Royal Masonic School for Boys

Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy

In the Tuscan hills of Northern Italy is an abandoned castle. Castello di Sammezzano. This castle is one of the finest examples of Moorish architecture in Italy. Sadly, it has been left to decay for more than 20 years.

Was erected in the early 17th century by a Spanish nobleman. More than 200 years later, the 365-room palace was remodeled. After World War II, Sammezzano became a luxury hotel, but was closed in the 1990s.

Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy

Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy

Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy

Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy
Castello di Sammezzano Non Plus Ultra abandoned Castle Tuscany Florence Italy

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...